Wednesday, December 26, 2012

Dr. Jeff Meldrum: Attributed Sasquatch Behavior Anticipates Great Ape Discoveries

Behaviors once attributed to Bigfoot are now found among other great apes
"...behaviors attributed to sasquatch which were once thought to be uncharacteristic of great apes, turn out to anticipate discoveries of the diversity of behaviors observed in the known great apes." -- Dr. Jeff Meldrum

While sharing a Scientific American article titled, "Are Western Chimpanzees a New Species of Pan?" Dr Jeff Meldrum, an Associate Professor of Anatomy and Anthropology at Idaho State University, stated,  "Here is an interesting article addressing the diversity of of behaviors of western chimps compared to the better studied eastern populations. These distinctions include: travel and forage at night (Pruetz & Bertolani, 2009), soak themselves, and play in water (Pruetz & Bertolani, 2009). I am again impressed that behaviors attributed to sasquatch which were once thought to be uncharacteristic of great apes, turn out to anticipate discoveries of the diversity of behaviors observed in the known great apes."

When challenged by a commentor to explain, "how actual field, behavioral studies of a known species of a Great Ape in Africa, applies to a creature whose traits appear only in anecdotal accounts of sightings of an unconfirmed bipedal animal in North America." Dr. Meldrum replies by making two points.

Dr. Meldrum further explained, "I think there are two issues at hand. One is an artificially narrow concept of "ape" behavior that has prevailed, which is based on limited field studies of a few relic populations of what was once a much more diverse radiation. This certainly has bearing on perceptions of the potential nature of sasquatch. The second is a demonstration that some behaviors anectdotally attributed to sasquatch, were received with incredulity by skeptics, precisely because no known ape exhibited them -- eating fish, swimming, nocturnal activity...These have subsequently been shown to be normal "ape" behaviors."

What may be even more interesting is the article that Dr. Meldrum is referencing. It claims there is a bias on Chimpanzee behavior and we are discovering that there may be chimpanzees that that made spears to hunt, lived in caves, and loved playing in water.  These are behaviors usually associated with ancient humans.

Click the following link to read about these newly discovered chimp behaviors including nocturnal activity.

9 comments:

  1. Really? That's way cool that chimps may have done those things. Deep down it's kinda freaky tho, lol.

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  2. Articles based on field studies, such as this, have contributed more the knowledge base of our unorthodox field than any lab study.

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  3. He's still pulling the great ape line???

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    Replies
    1. Yeah for real... everyone knows they're Aliens, duh

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  4. Wow. This proves nothing. It is especially disappointing coming from the most (and post-Ketchum, perhaps the last) respected scientist associated with Bigfoot. He has arbitrarily selected 3 attributed behaviors mentioned by self-identified witnesses. He has neglected to mention such gems as: the ability to see in the infra-red spectrum (and thus avoid trail cameras); the ability to travel between dimensions; the ability to speak human language and/or communicate telepathically; and a fondness for blueberry bagels.

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    1. Least respected scientist would be Melba Ketchum, Meldrum uses facts while Melba uses make believe.

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    2. It says "last," not "least."

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  5. Anonymous talking to Anonymous. Good comments, but do you exist?
    Just kidding. I assume you exist. Seeing a bigfoot in broad daylight takes a person from skeptic or "sorta believer" to "knowing." Proof no longer needed. We need skeptics in every line of investigation, so here's to all skeptics for an exciting year in the deep woods. The three behaviors of sasquatches that were observed in apes is definitely only a partial list. Fondness for blueberry bagels is questionable. It may be cinnamon rolls. The others listed by Anonymous tongue-in-cheek may all be human traits largely undeveloped and under-reported. I enjoy reading about Padre Pio, who died in 1968. What do you make of his reported traits of mind reading and bi-location?

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  6. We need more Skeptics, tho... NOT SCOFFERS.

    Those who dismiss evidence out-of-hand do NOBODY any service. Least of all Science.

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