Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Kultus Week, Day 5: Bigfoot and Trolls

A different rendering of the Kultus Bigfoot
Earlier this month novelist Kirk Sigurdson released his much-anticipated novel about Bigfoot. Like any great novel, it's themes transcend what the book is "about". There is no doubt if you are fascinated by Bigfoot and want to read something by somebody who knows a thing or two about the Sasquatch phenomenon, Kultus will be a book you will recommend to a friend.

I feel like a lot of Bigfoot fiction (movies too) fall short because they are usually ONLY about Bigfoot. Too many nods to established Bigfoot canon; Bluff Creek, Ape Canyon, P/G Film. I understand there should be some homage to these pillars of bigfootery, but what about something that stretches us a little?

 This brings us to Kultus. And the Bigfoot troll.

Head detail of Kultus Bigfoot Troll

In the Bigfoot community we have the fortune of Native American oral traditions, these have shaped our curiosity and even our research. What if there is an additional way to describe Bigfoot, based on other traditions? How far have we dug? Are there European or Arabic Bigfoot legends we have ignored?

While the Bigfoot in Kultus is traditional, in the sense that it does not conflict with most behaviors we have heard and read about, it is an inspiration to broaden our understanding of the Sasquatch phenomena. 

At KultusBook.com, the companion blog to the Kutus novel, you can read a two-part series on Trolls and Bigfoot. We have a small blurb for part one and part two below. 

The Troll Mythos, Part I

Was Beowulf essentially a tale of the first "bigfooter?" Perhaps. Most literary critics, college professors, and armchair anthropologists today have no idea that readers of Beowulf (or listeners to the oral tradition) were terrified of real life bog beasts, just as Native Americans were terrified of Bigfoot.  And there is a very good reason for this parallel. Read more of Troll Mythos, Part I

The Troll Mythos, Part II

To ancient Europeans, these creatures were known as "trolls."  As centuries passed, the legends became myths and these myths then devolved into silly caricatures of themselves. This tendency actually parallels modern science's reluctance to analyze a species of relict hominid that has been around far longer than the discipline of science, and perhaps even homo homo sapiens. The irony of such a parallel is not lost on me. If the proof is in the pudding, then the troll is in the machine, so to speak. Read more of Troll Mythos Part II

You can buy the novel Kultus from Amazon at the link below or buy signed copies from Kirk Sigurdson himself at KultusBook.com



3 comments:

  1. you'll never make it as an investigator, there are so many ways that can be searched its incredible you haven't spoke of them. or is it you don't want to speak of the for fear someone may actually find him and there goes everything down the tubes...a lot of us descended from a long time ago, so did Sasquatch. like maybe aysaw. you know bigfoot just doesn't make it any more. we have to find a decent name for him. you guys really should read your Bibles more often.....lol.... and then leave him in peace....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jonathan PoulsenDec 17, 2013, 1:49:00 PM

      Who are you talking to?

      Delete
    2. anybody that will listen Jonathan I see mistakes all over the place....and don't forget, he is human.....

      Delete

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